7 Things to Know About Western Meadowlark

The Western Meadowlark, a common bird in western North America, is a pale brown singer, foraging in open fields for insects.

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A chunky bird with yellow breast, flute-like song, and camouflaged plumage in open habitats. Males slightly larger and more colorful.

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Identification

Feeds on grain and insects, forages with a sharp beak, adaptable to diverse habitats, includes carrion in diet, winter emphasis on oats.

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Food

Female builds ground nests with 5 speckled eggs. Chicks fledge in 10-12 days; if unsuccessful, they renest.

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Nesting and Eggs

Adaptable Western Meadowlarks thrive in various North American habitats. Not endangered, but face challenges from habitat conversion.

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Current Situation

The Western Meadowlark, state bird in six states (KS, NE, ND, MT, OR, WY), is renowned for its presence and distinctive song.

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Facts

Audubon, noting distinct songs, proposed Western Meadowlark as separate from Eastern. Latin name "neglecta" reflects prior oversight.

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