7 Things to Know About Western Meadowlark

A sandy brown bird with yellow highlights, is common in western North America, often seen singing on roadsides.

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Chunky bird with blue-gray beak, yellow breast V-mark, camouflaged upperparts, flute-like song in open habitats.

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Identification

Western Meadowlark eats insects, grain, and seeds, foraging in open fields, grasslands. Also scavenges carrion and preys on other birds' eggs.

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Food

Dome-shaped grass nests of Western Meadowlarks hold 5 speckled eggs. Chicks fledge in 10-12 days; females may nest again if first attempt fails.

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Nesting and Eggs

Western Meadowlarks thrive in open grasslands across North America, migrating south for winter. Commonly found, not endangered.

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Current Situation

The Western Meadowlark, state bird of Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Montana, Oregon, and Wyoming, is widely recognized and heard.

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Facts

John James Audubon identified Western Meadowlark as separate from Eastern. Named it "neglecta" due to prior oversight.

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Female grassland birds run on ground when disturbed to hide nest location, common behavior in species.

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