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Want more birds? Try fruit and nuts.

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds
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Offering fruit and nuts is a good way to attract species that do not normally visit seed feeders.

Fruit eaters include :

American Robin
waxwings,
bluebirds,
Northern Mockingbird
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Flickers
Blue Jays
Orioles
Tanagers
Northern Cardinal
Towhees
and many more

Raisins and currents:  Soak overnight and offer on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Strawberries, cherries, blueberries and grapes:  Cut in half and offer on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Apples:  Offer sliced or chopped apples on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Orange and grapefruit: Slice in half and nail to the side of a tree or offer on a platform.

Watermelon:  There is usually a little meat on a watermelon rind or un-eaten portion. Placed in a good location it attacks a few bugs, also butterflies, mockingbirds and cardinals.  Last year a Red-bellied Woodpecker that seemed to have a taste for watermelon would visit fairly often.

Grape jelly:  Popular with orioles.

Nuts:
Peanuts are popular with woodpeckers and nuthatches.  Shelled raw peanuts can be offered in feeders designed for feeding peanuts.  Offer peanuts in the shell on a platform feeder or on the ground.

Peanut butter also works for the above species plus native sparrows and Pine Siskins. Offer straight or mix the peanut butter with 3-4 parts corn mill.  Spread the mixture on a tree trunk, place in spaces in a pine cone, or fill holes drilled in a board or dead limb. 

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