Bird Feeding with George Petrides

Tips on attracting and feeding backyard birds.

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Attracting and feeding wild birds

Sharing ideas and topics related to feeding and attracting wild birds in your backyard.

Subcategories from this category: Conservation

Keeping squirrels away from bird seed has always been a challenge.  A popular choice these days is to select seeds blended with hot pepper or suet with hot pepper.  The birds are not bothered by the hot pepper but it does effect the squirrels, keeping them for emptying your feeder in one visit.  The hot pepper seeds and suet are more expensive but can be cheaper in the long run if squirrels are eating much of the seed you are putting out.

The more plants, shrubs, vines, trees, flowers you have the more birds you will have and the greater diversity you will have.

However, I am the world's laziest gardener.  I just do not do like buying spring flowers and planting them.  It is expensive and takes time away from doing something useful, like resting on the sofa.  

Too ease this horrible burden, each spring I buy a few packets of native wildflower seeds.  I sprinkle them on the ground and rake over them lightly.  I do little or nothing to prepare the ground.  They do not get any special treatment in the wild so why not make them feel right at home?  

Guess what.  I usually end up with a nice array of wild flowers.  Some grow and flower early in the year and some later.  The plant succession is interesting to watch.  

Big bonus!  The wildflowers produce their own seed.  I have had pretty good luck with some flowers coming back year after year, on their own.  The flowers are not all lined up in a pretty row but that is not something I really care about. 

I leave the seed pods up until late in the year.  Not as attractive as the flowers, but allows the plants to reseed and gives the birds something to snack on.

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The flowers were past their peak and do not look as much of a mess as in this photo.  All came back on their own, including the cone flowers in the upper right.  Butterflies, including a beautiful Tiger Swallowtail, and hummingbirds have stopped by to feed. 

Males are typically the most vocal. They sing to establish and defend their territory and to attract a mate.

Females of some species such as the Northern Cardinal will also sing.

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Female cardinal. Photograph © Greg Lavaty

Northern Cardinal females will sing from the nest, despite the risk of giving away the nest location. One theory is the song may give the male information about when to bring food.

Mated cardinals share song phrases, but the female may actually outdo the male in some ways, singing a longer and more complex song than the male.

Feeding birds in the spring can be one of the most productive times.  Many colorful species, including  orioles, tanagers, and buntings will begin to move north from their winter homes.  As they move north across the country many of these birds will stop at feeders along the way,

One such bird is the Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  Each spring we receive numerous photographs of the male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that have stopped at a feeder as they pass through on their journey north.

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You can improve your chances of attracting birds as they move north by offering water - especially with a small waterfall rock which can add sound to help attract the birds.  Also expand food offerings - try suet, grape jelly and softened raisins along with sunflower.

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Nest boxes often deserve a little spring cleaning also.  If you have nest boxes for bluebirds or other species be sure to check inside before nesting occurs. Insects and mice may have utilized the nest box for protection in the fall and winter.  Be careful when opening the nest box for the first time, as you never know what could be inside.

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