The Birdzilla Blog

Information from the world of birding, including new content and products from Birdzilla.com.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form
Sam Crowe

Sam Crowe

Sam Crowe is founder and president of Birdzilla.com.

Cowbirds will sometimes dominate bird feeders and have been proven to have contributed to population decreases in birds like the Kirtland's  and  Golden-cheeked Warbler.  Trapping programs have been used to reduce cowbird populations in some areas.  If cowbirds are dominating your feeder try different food choices, such as safflower or suet.

Males and females are different in appearance.  Males are black with a brown head, naturally.  The females are a dull gray-brown in in color.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Brown-headed-Cowbird-gl.jpg

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_Brown-headed-Cowbird-f-gl.jpg

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a parasitic nester, in that it lays its eggs in the nest of other species.  One theory is that the cowbirds followed buffalo herds as the buffalo roamed, feeding on the insects they buffalo scared up.  Since the buffalo roamed widely, the cowbirds were forced to either stop following the buffalos or lay their eggs in the nest of other species, to raise their young.  Some song birds seem to happily raise the cowbirds, while others create a new nest when a cowbird egg is discovered,.  These days the lawn mower has replaced the buffalo and the cowbirds have become common in suburban areas.  


Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

During cold winter months three similar finches, sometimes referred to as the "red finches" move into different areas.  Their ranges can vary year-to-year. 

Can you tell which-is-which - Cassin's, House or Purple Finch?

b2ap3_thumbnail_house-finch-m300.jpg    b2ap3_thumbnail_cassins-finch-m300.jpg    b2ap3_thumbnail_purple-finch-m300.jpg


The three species can be hard to identify.   If you are seeing a House Finch or Purple Finch that looks just a little different you may have a new species citing your feeder.  Visit the Red Finches Identification page to learn about separating these 3 similar species.

Blue Jays are not everyone's favorite bird.  Their aggressive behavior can sometimes drive smaller birds away from feeders.  They are, however, very interesting birds and and have their fans.  Here's how they are described in the Bent Life History Series.

b2ap3_thumbnail_blue-jay-c1.jpg
© Stephen Muskie


"The blue jay is a strong, healthy-looking bird, noisy and boisterous.  He gives us the impression of being independent, lawless, haughty, even impudent, with a disregard for his neighbors' rights and wishes: like Hotspur, as we meet him in Henry IV, part 1.


To be sure, the jay has his quiet moments, as we shall see, but his mercurial temper, always just below the boiling point, is ever ready to flare up into rage and screaming attack, or, like many another diplomat, beat a crafty retreat.  He is a strikingly beautiful bird: blue, black, and white, big and strong, his head carrying a high, pointed crest which in anger shoots upward like a flame.  Walter Faxon long ago told me of a distinguished visiting English ornithologist who was eager to see a live blue jay because he considered it the finest bird in the world.  He was surprised to find that this beauty, as he called it, is one of our common birds."

There are several ways to carve a pumpkin into a feeder.  One of the easiest ways is to cut a small to medium-sized pumpkin (3- to 5-pounds) in half.  Scoop out the soft stuff, leaving a shell about 1/2 inch think.   Make perches by making small holes and inserting twigs.  Use 2 loops of twine to make a basket hanger for the feeder, or purchase a hanger from a local arts and crafts store.  Allow the insides to dry before adding sunflower seed.  

b2ap3_thumbnail_pumpkin-feeder.jpg

Another approach for hanging is to stick two dowel rods through the pumpkin from opposite sides, then tie the twine to the dowel rods.
  Search Google for "pumpkin bird feeder" to see many creative designs.

Lively as windup toys, nuthatches pirouette on branches and descend headfirst down tree trunks, combing the bark for insects.  Divided into four species, these short-tailed song birds are found almost anywhere in North America where there are trees.

Nuthatches are cavity nesters as some

b2ap3_thumbnail_white-breasted-nuthatch.jpg
White-breasted Nuthatch

b2ap3_thumbnail_red-breasted-nuthatch.jpg
Red-breasted Nuthatch has a call that sounds like a tooting tin horn.

Other nuthatch species include the Brown-headed and Pygmy Nuthatch.

Nuthatches visit feeders for sunflower, suet and peanuts.

Staying warm in harsh winter conditions can be a challenge to many species.  Several small birds, including bluebirds, chickadees, titmice and kinglets will use roost boxes to stay warm on cold winter nights.

A next box can be used as a roost box.  Check to make sure it is clean inside as cold weather starts.  Insects or other critters may have move in since the end of the nesting season.

b2ap3_thumbnail_roost-box.jpg

Most roost box designs have the entry hole at the bottom to help keep warm air in.  Some nest box designs allow the front plate to rotate, with the hole on the top in the summer, and the bottom in the winter.

Something as simple as a small brush pile in a corner of your property can also serve as a good place for birds to find shelter from winter snows and storms.

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

Temperatures remain in the 90's in Texas but there winter storm warnings in parts of the country.  So in Texas, we have not seen signs of fall but other parts of the country skipped fall and went straight to winter.  Go figure.  

With cold and snow becoming an issue, here are a couple of thoughts for providing winter protection for the birds.

Winter can be a dangerous time in the backyard.  Leaves are off the trees, making roosting spots much more visible to predators.  Wind, heavy rain and snow take turns making the local environment inhospitable to birds and other small creatures. This is a time of testing for our wild friends.

A simple brush pile can help make our yards a little safer during this harsh time of year.  It’s simple to create, doesn’t require a major investment of time or materials. It does provide safe haven for birds, bugs, and bunnies, among others. The birds can hide from cats and hawks, stay warmer and dryer in snowstorms, and even find a snack in the decaying wood.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_brush.png
Brush piles can be small or large, thin, or tall.  Even a small brush pile offers cover.

Pick an acceptable spot in your yard, some place that won’t be a visual or physical stumbling point for people.  To be of best use to birds, you want to create a kind of thicket, with dense cover on the outside and more open spaces on the inside.  You can start as you would to build a campfire, creating a teepee of dead wood.  Then pile on branches pruned from shrubs and trees, twigs dropped by wind and storms, even leftover greenery from the holidays.  Christmas trees can have a whole new life tucked in a corner of your yard where the birds can hide.

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

It is a little early to start thinking about winter bird feeding and behavior, especially with the Texas heat, where I live, still in the 90's.  But as a precursor here is one thing to look for.  Over-wintering warblers and woodpeckers will also hang around the fringe of the chickadee/titmice flocks.

During winter, chickadees and titmice may flock together and are often seen flitting back and forth from cover to your feeders at the same time. Titmice, which are larger than chickadees, dominate certain feeding niches chickadees might otherwise occupy. But the advantages of being part of a flock may compensate the chickadees for loss of feeding area.

b2ap3_thumbnail_chickadee.jpg

Flocking advantages include having more than one pair of eyes to locate dwindling winter food supplies. The death rate due to predation may also decline when birds flock together. Because most trees have lost their leaves, the woods are more open in winter, making these birds more vulnerable to predation. Flocking birds also share responsibility for predator alerts. Once an alarm call is given, the flock will often engage in a behavior known as “mobbing”. Instead of fleeing, the birds will gather together and harass the predator. Titmice seem to be particularly bold in their attacks and will dive at the predator or pull at its feathers or fur.

Keeping squirrels away from bird seed has always been a challenge.  A popular choice these days is to select seeds blended with hot pepper or suet with hot pepper.  The birds are not bothered by the hot pepper but it does effect the squirrels, keeping them for emptying your feeder in one visit.  The hot pepper seeds and suet are more expensive but can be cheaper in the long run if squirrels are eating much of the seed you are putting out.

The more plants, shrubs, vines, trees, flowers you have the more birds you will have and the greater diversity you will have.

However, I am the world's laziest gardener.  I just do not do like buying spring flowers and planting them.  It is expensive and takes time away from doing something useful, like resting on the sofa.  

Too ease this horrible burden, each spring I buy a few packets of native wildflower seeds.  I sprinkle them on the ground and rake over them lightly.  I do little or nothing to prepare the ground.  They do not get any special treatment in the wild so why not make them feel right at home?  

Guess what.  I usually end up with a nice array of wild flowers.  Some grow and flower early in the year and some later.  The plant succession is interesting to watch.  

Big bonus!  The wildflowers produce their own seed.  I have had pretty good luck with some flowers coming back year after year, on their own.  The flowers are not all lined up in a pretty row but that is not something I really care about. 

I leave the seed pods up until late in the year.  Not as attractive as the flowers, but allows the plants to reseed and gives the birds something to snack on.

b2ap3_thumbnail_flowers.jpg


The flowers were past their peak and do not look as much of a mess as in this photo.  All came back on their own, including the cone flowers in the upper right.  Butterflies, including a beautiful Tiger Swallowtail, and hummingbirds have stopped by to feed. 

Males are typically the most vocal. They sing to establish and defend their territory and to attract a mate.

Females of some species such as the Northern Cardinal will also sing.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Northern-Cardinal-f-gl.gif
Female cardinal. Photograph © Greg Lavaty

Northern Cardinal females will sing from the nest, despite the risk of giving away the nest location. One theory is the song may give the male information about when to bring food.

Mated cardinals share song phrases, but the female may actually outdo the male in some ways, singing a longer and more complex song than the male.

Feeding birds in the spring can be one of the most productive times.  Many colorful species, including  orioles, tanagers, and buntings will begin to move north from their winter homes.  As they move north across the country many of these birds will stop at feeders along the way,

One such bird is the Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  Each spring we receive numerous photographs of the male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that have stopped at a feeder as they pass through on their journey north.

b2ap3_thumbnail_rose-breatsed-grosbeak-m-gl.jpg

You can improve your chances of attracting birds as they move north by offering water - especially with a small waterfall rock which can add sound to help attract the birds.  Also expand food offerings - try suet, grape jelly and softened raisins along with sunflower.

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

Nest boxes often deserve a little spring cleaning also.  If you have nest boxes for bluebirds or other species be sure to check inside before nesting occurs. Insects and mice may have utilized the nest box for protection in the fall and winter.  Be careful when opening the nest box for the first time, as you never know what could be inside.

b2ap3_thumbnail_chichadee-at-nestbox.jpg

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

Cedar Waxwings are in the southern part of the United States during the winter.  These beautiful and distinctive birds are described in the Bent Life History series as follows:

Cedar waxwings impress us as being unlike most of the birds we know. We see them commonly in flocks or small companies through the greater part of the year, but we never know just when they will appear, or how numerously, for the movements of these flocks do not conform to the regular northern and southern swings of migration that the majority of North American birds make to and from their breeding grounds. Moreover, unlike most birds, there is no close relationship between the time of their arrival on their nesting grounds and the commencement of breeding.

b2ap3_thumbnail_cedar-waxwing-cover.jpg
When we become well acquainted with the waxwing we look upon him as the perfect gentleman of the bird world. There is in him a refinement of deportment and dress; his voice is gentle and subdued; he is quiet and dignified in manner, sociable, never quarrelsome, and into one of his habits, that of sharing food with his companions, we may read, without too much stress of imagination, the quality of politeness, almost unselfishness, very rare, almost unheard of, in the animal kingdom. His plumage is delicate in coloring: soft, quiet browns, grays, and pale yellow: set off, like a carnation in our buttonhole, by a touch of red on the wing.

1. Provide water for your birds in a bird bath, small pond or other water feature. Remember that moving water is a magnet for birds.  Add a water heater in the winter to provide open water.  Pumps or the birdbath may need to be drained if a heater is not used.

2. Although it may be shocking to see a hawk taking a bird in your backyard, there is no need for alarm. High mortality rates are normal for songbirds and balance their high reproductive rates.

3. Select a variety of trees and shrubs for your yard to provide food, shelter and nesting sites for birds year-round.

4. Remember that birds prefer feeders that give them easy access to food. Some feeders designed to keep squirrels and larger birds away often receive fewer visits from small birds as well. Always choose a bird feeder that has high bird appeal and, if necessary, use baffles or other methods to keep squirrels away. Then make sure all feeding ports and feeding areas are kept clear of debris so your birds have easy access to food.

Posted by on in Attracting and feeding wild birds

Many bird species will cache food in the fall for retrieval in the winter, including Blue Jays, Black-capped Chickadees, nuthatches, and Tufted Titmice.  Most try to hide their food cache from other birds.  A champion at storing the food, right in the open, is the Acorn Woodpecker.  They will often drill hundreds of holes in a selected tree, power pole are even in wooden shingles.  They carefully place acorns in the holes for consumption when food is less plentiful.  These interesting birds will also "hawk" for insects (capture insects in flight).  They will visit feeders for peanuts and suet.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_acorn-woodpecker-gl.jpg
Acorn Woodpecker © Greg Lavaty

One exciting way to enjoy the upcoming fall migration is by supercharging your yard and feeding station for hummingbirds. The hummingbird nesting season is pretty much complete, and you may already have noticed increased activity in your yard. As this pre-migration period kicks-in, hummer numbers at your feeders will increase as the birds prepare for their journey south. Migrating is an energy-intensive activity and hummingbirds must bolster fat reserves to fuel their migration flights. Adding an additional feeder or two and providing natural food sources will benefit the birds and provide some fun high-speed entertainment when hummingbirds flock to your yard.

There are several hummingbird festivals around the country, here are a couple of the more popular events.

Aug. 23 - Aug. 26
Davis Mountains Hummingbird Celebration
Fort Davis, Texas

Sept. 13 - Sept. 16
30th Rockport-Fulton HummerBird Celebration
Rockport-Fulton, Texas

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_hummingbird-feeder-2.jpg

Posted by on in Conservation

Many garage doors have a cord with a red handle for lowering the door.  When the door is up, the red handle will sometimes draw a hummingbird into the garage, where it can have a difficult time escaping.  Paint the handle black or cover it in black tape to prevent this problem.

 

b2ap3_thumbnail_hum1.jpg

If a hummingbird does get trapped in your garage, try closing the door and turning off the light.  Hummingbirds do not like to fly in the dark and can sometimes easily be picked up and taken outside.  Hold the hummer gently, open your hand slowly and give the hummer a chance to orient itself before it again takes to the air.

A singing bird creates musical sounds using its syrinx. This organ is a kind of double voice box at the bottom of the bird’s windpipe. Where the windpipe branches into the bird’s lungs, two sets of membranes and muscles vibrate at high frequencies as air is exhaled. In fact, while singing, a bird can alternate exhaling between its two lungs and thereby sing in harmony with itself.

b2ap3_thumbnail_singing-bird_20151012-144643_1.jpg
Northern Mockingbird

Usually a male that is defending a territory or attracting a mate will sing from one of the highest or most conspicuous perches available. This favorite spot may be used repeatedly. On the other hand, some birds such as larks, Bobolinks, and buntings – often sing while flying. And while birds do not usually sing around their nests, a few may sing a quiet “whisper song” that can be heard for only a few yards.

b2ap3_thumbnail_Mockingbird-checking-out-KT-Wright-Chattanooga-TN.jpg
Northern Mockingbird

In the final analysis, different birds sing different songs, but they usually sing for the same reasons.

b2ap3_thumbnail_rose-breasted-grosbeak-female.jpg
Female Rose-breasted Grosbeak

And who knows, some of those reasons may be that they are well-fed, stress free, and what we would anthropomorphically describe as “”happy!”

Offering fruit and nuts is a good way to attract species that do not normally visit seed feeders.

Fruit eaters include :

American Robin
waxwings,
bluebirds,
Northern Mockingbird
Rose-breasted Grosbeak
Flickers
Blue Jays
Orioles
Tanagers
Northern Cardinal
Towhees
and many more

Raisins and currents:  Soak overnight and offer on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Strawberries, cherries, blueberries and grapes:  Cut in half and offer on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Apples:  Offer sliced or chopped apples on a platform feeder or shallow dish.

Orange and grapefruit: Slice in half and nail to the side of a tree or offer on a platform.

Watermelon:  There is usually a little meat on a watermelon rind or un-eaten portion. Placed in a good location it attacks a few bugs, also butterflies, mockingbirds and cardinals.  Last year a Red-bellied Woodpecker that seemed to have a taste for watermelon would visit fairly often.

Grape jelly:  Popular with orioles.

Nuts:
Peanuts are popular with woodpeckers and nuthatches.  Shelled raw peanuts can be offered in feeders designed for feeding peanuts.  Offer peanuts in the shell on a platform feeder or on the ground.

Peanut butter also works for the above species plus native sparrows and Pine Siskins. Offer straight or mix the peanut butter with 3-4 parts corn mill.  Spread the mixture on a tree trunk, place in spaces in a pine cone, or fill holes drilled in a board or dead limb. 

Powered by EasyBlog for Joomla!