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Sam Crowe on August 21st, 2017

While many birders flock to air conditioned comfort during August, many shorebird species will start their southern migration during the month. According to the Stanford web site more than 20 million shorebirds migrate through the United States to the Arctic each year. The web page includes the following information. “As a group, shorebirds undertake some […]

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It has been know for several years that some birds see well in the UV range and that UV markings on windows, while not visible to humans, can be detected by birds and offer protection from window collisions. The UV effect might not be ideal for evey situation, as reported from this excerpt from research […]

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From the Friends of the Wild Whoopers web site. “The remote muskeg of the taiga in Wood Buffalo National Park in Alberta, and its surrounding environs have long been the last holdout for nesting Whooping Cranes on the continent. This wild population, discovered in 1954 by Robert Porter Allen, is the population that migrates annually […]

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Sam Crowe on July 16th, 2017

I found this article on the Black-capped Vireo and cowbird predation especially interesting as several years ago I had the opportunity to spend the day at Fort Hood in central Texas, where much of this study took place. The fine folks from the Nature Conservancy were studying both the Black-capped Vireo and Golden-cheeked Warbler and […]

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Sam Crowe on July 9th, 2017

Zoologists at the University of Cambridge filmed a group of Mallards hunting other birds on a reservoir in Romania. Two fledglings – a grey wagtail and a black redstart – were chased and swallowed when they landed in the water. Mallards normally feed on seeds, plants and insects. Small fish are occasionally on the menu […]

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Sam Crowe on July 4th, 2017

A new parrot species has been identified from the Yucatán Peninsula: The Blue-winged Amazon. I had no idea there were remote parts of the Yucatán Peninsula but apparently there are. The next time I make a trip to Cancun think I’ll wonder inland a little bit. In 2014, during a visit to one of the […]

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Sam Crowe on June 26th, 2017

The speculum is a patch of often iridescent color on the secondary feathers of many duck species.  It is often seen as a bright patch of color on the rear of the wing when the wing is spread during flight or when the bird is stretching.  The color and size of the speculum varies by […]

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Sam Crowe on June 18th, 2017

What is the only North American (U.S. and Canada) songbird that breeds exclusively in Canada?  It is one of our most beautiful, and one of my favorite sparrows – the Harris’s Sparrow. The Harris’s Sparrow nests primarily in the boreal-tundra transition of the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and the northernmost parts of Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario. […]

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Sam Crowe on June 4th, 2017

This little bit if happy news is from The Birding Community E-Bulletin. In a refreshing move of bipartisanship, Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL) and Rep. Morgan Griffith (R-VA) recently introduced the Federal Bird-Safe Buildings Act. The bill (H.R. 2542) is designed to amend title 40 of the United States Code to direct the General Services Administration […]

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Audubon has launched a pilot program called Climate Watch. The plan is to use bluebirds and nuthatch observations to validate Audubon’s predictions on how birds’ territory ranges will shift in response to a changing climate. Audubon released its Birds and Climate Change Report in 2014. It used Christmas Bird Count and Breeding Bird Survey data […]

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