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Description of the Limpkin

BREEDING MALE

The Limpkin is a tall wading bird with a long, slightly downcurved bill, long legs, and dark brown plumage heavily streaked with white.

 

Limbkin

Female

Sexes similar.

limpkin gl
Photograph © Greg Lavaty

Seasonal change in appearance

None.

Juvenile

Resemble adults.

Habitat

Freshwater marshes.

Diet

Snails.

Behavior

Forages by wading in shallow water.

Range

Resident in Florida, as well as Mexico south to South America. Populations declining in the U.S.

More information:

Bent Life History

Visit the Bent Life History for extensive additional information on the Limpkin.

Fun Facts

Wetland conservation is essential for Limpkins to continue to thrive.

Limpkins are very tolerant of other bird species in their vicinity.

Vocalizations

Loud, repeated “kow” or wailing notes are given.

Nesting

The nest is a platform of plant materials placed above the water in emergent vegetation, or in short trees.

Number: 4-8.
Color: Olive with darker markings.

Incubation and fledging:
- Young hatch at 26-28 days.  
- Young fledge (leave the nest) within a day after hatching but remain with the adults for some time.