Description of the Acorn Woodpecker

BREEDING MALE

The Acorn Woodpecker is mostly black, with a white rump, belly, and white encircling the face, red crown, and white irises. Males have more extensive red on the head.

 

acorn woodpecker

Female

Sexes similar, although females have less red on the head.

Seasonal change in appearance

None.

Juvenile

Similar to adults but less glossy.

Habitat

Oak woodlands.

Diet

Acorns and insects.

Behavior

Acorn Woodpeckers glean insects from tree branches or catch them in the air. They also harvest acorns and store them in holes drilled in the trunks of trees.

Range

Acorn Woodpeckers occur in parts of the western and southwestern U.S.

 

More information:

Bent Life History

Visit the Bent Life History for extensive additional information on the Acorn Woodpecker.

 

Fun Facts

The Acorn Woodpecker lives in colonies, and several adults may help incubate the eggs in a single nest.

So-called granary trees in which acorns are stored for later use may contain tens of thousands of acorns.

Vocalizations

The call is a "waka-waka-waka."

Attracting

Acorn Woodpeckers will take nectar, and occasionally come to hummingbird feeders. Will also feed on suet and peanuts.

Nesting

The Acorn Woodpecker's nest is in a tree cavity.

Number: 3-7.
Color: White.

Incubation and fledging:
- Young hatch at about 11-14 days.
- Young fledge (leave the nest) at about 30-32 days, but associate with the adults for some time.